FAQs

Questions

What is the official website for the Bartlesville Public Schools District?

Go to https://sites.google.com/a/bps-ok.org/website/home for a comprehensive view of the school district including news, events, calendars and links to individual schools.

What technology tools are available to the teachers and students?

All Bartlesville elementary classrooms have a Promethean Board, overhead projector, two computers and internet connection. Each site has a computer lab with 25 computers, and many schools have laptop and iPad carts available for checkout. Site libraries also have digital cameras available for checkout.

What are the student to teacher ratios in the elementary, middle and high schools?

Class sizes in Bartlesville schools vary considerable depending on grade level, subject matter and special needs of students. In general, classes are smaller than those of many peer school districts. Parents can expect classes to average around 25 students in the higher grades, while classes will be smaller at the elementary and pre-K levels. The district-wide ratio of total students to total classroom teachers is 16-1, including special education teachers. The student-teacher ratio averages 17-1 in elementary schools, 13-1 in middle schools, 17-1 in Mid-High and 16-1 in the high school. Data on the number of students and teachers at each school are contained in the table on the Academics page.

How do the test scores of Bartlesville students compare with those elsewhere in Oklahoma?

Bartlesville Public Schools have consistently scored in the top two or three percent of the largest 32 school districts in the state. BPSD has a strong academic performance, and a high percentage of the students score at an advanced level in math and reading when compared to other districts.

Are Bruin athletes true “student athletes”? Are academics stressed within the athletic ranks?

BPSD athletes are true student athletes in every sense of the word. In the 2014-15 school year, all BPSD athletic teams earned an overall GPA of 3.77, resulting in 22 Academic State Championship teams.  The average grade points by team are as follows: Boys cross country - 3.9; Girls cross country - 3.9; Football - 3.2; Softball - 3.7; Volleyball - 3.9; Boys basketball - 3.5; Girls basketball - 3.6; Boys swimming - 3.4; Girls swimming - 3.9; Wrestling - 3.1; Baseball - 3.6; Girls Golf - 3.7; Boys golf - 3.5; Girls soccer - 3.6; Boys soccer - 3.7; Girls tennis - 3.9; Boys tennis - 3.9; Girls track - 3.8; Boys track - 3.7; Slow pitch - 3.6; Cheer - 3.5, and Pom - 3.6. 

Can a student in the Bartlesville schools receive college credit for courses taken in high school?

Yes, Bartlesville High School currently offers 18 AP classes. Students in those classes are eligible to test, which gives them college credit at most universities. Also offered are concurrent classes in which students take college-level classes taught by college professors as one of their high school classes. In the fall 2015 semester, the district will begin providing STEM classes at the high school thanks to a Phillips 66 grant.

Does Bartlesville have any "online" (virtual) classes?

Yes, the Bartlesville Public School District offers online classes for advancement and to make up classes.

What about the quality of teachers within the Bartlesville Public School District?

A third of the district's teachers have earned advanced degrees, including more than half of the high school teaching faculty. Teachers from all grade levels attend a variety of professional development opportunities offered by the district and outside the district, and many choose to pursue advanced degrees.

What safety measures have taken place by the school district to protect the children?

When it comes to the safety of students, the district's goal is to build trusting relationships among students, staff and parents. Key steps that have been taken to build a secure environment for students include:

  1. A Lobby Guard system is now in place at all of school sites, requiring visitors to check into the system and wear a badge before being permitted into the school.
  2. Each site conducts safe site committee meetings with parents included. Safety planning meetings are held with BPSD first responders to update the emergency crisis plan.
  3. A Student Crime Stoppers tip line has been created and shared with students and the public so students and the public have a way to report concerns anonymously.
  4. School Resource Officers are located strategically at two sites so they are able to easily get to any of the other sites if needed.
  5. Every Bartlesville Public School District site conducts 10 safety drills a year. First responders inspect each site, identifying tornado shelter areas and providing a list of safety measures relevant to each site.

How does the district serve the transportation needs of parents looking to get their children to and from school?

The district aims to relieve the pressure on families by providing free transportation to and from school. The transportation section uses a computer bus routing system that provides the most efficient and timely routes possible. Currently the transportation section has 26 regular bus routes and five special needs bus routes. Average daily ridership on the 26 regular routes is approximately 1,600 students, with an additional 75 to 90 special needs students transported daily. School buses are designed to be safer than passenger vehicles in avoiding crashes and preventing injury. Examples are crush standards, size and height, flashing red lights, cross view mirrors, reinforced sides, bright color and stop sign arms.

Additional transportation safeguards include a three-camera system on all buses that provides added security to both driver and students; a state-of-the-art digitally encrypted two-way radio for complete privacy and security for all radio communications; and a satellite GPS to remotely see locations of all buses. Bus drivers are professionals, trained for their vehicles. They have all passed background checks and are regularly drug tested. The bus fleet is inspected before and after use on each school day, and vehicles are thoroughly inspected yearly by a certified mechanic.

What are the volunteer opportunities within the district?

There are numerous volunteer opportunities for parents and community volunteers within the district. Throughout the year, schools need volunteer tutors, school Parent/Teacher Association officers & members, reading buddies, test proctors, story tellers/readers, field trip monitors, lunch room monitors, cross walk guards and classroom assistants to help with copying, developing bulletins and many other functions.

Are Bartlesville public school parents very involved? Would it be easy for me to pitch in and help?

Yes, Bartlesville Public School District parents are very involved. If you are a parent wanting to volunteer at your child’s school, contact the school’s Parent/Teacher Association. If you are a community member looking to volunteer, please contact Christina Rigdon 918-337-6231 ex: 1635 or visit https://sites.google.com/a/bps-ok.org/website/home to access the required forms needed to begin the screening process for volunteering. All prospective volunteers must be 18 or older, be of good moral character and pass a background screening.

Why is the school district going to a four-year high school?

The district Long-Range Facilities Planning Committee, made up of parents, teachers and administrators, recommended expanding to grades 9-12 at the high school for several reasons, including:

  1. It will reduce the number of school transitions for students (from three to two transitions), which extensive research has shown to improve student achievement.
  2. It should open up more advanced coursework and electives to high school freshmen and sophomores.
  3. Over time, it should reduce operational costs by closing one of the four secondary school sites.
  4. It will reduce transportation of students across town for routine athletics and fine arts practices and advanced coursework.

What is the rationale for the Freshman Center concept?

Research shows that the ninth grade year is a critical one in terms of student retention. The creation of the Freshman Center is based on feedback from other four-year high schools in Oklahoma, including the high-performing Edmond district, which reported success with this approach in transitioning students from middle school to high school.

The Freshman Center provides a separate area for ninth grade core classes, with its own administrative offices, guidance counselor, library, and computer labs. This arrangement allows freshmen to spend most of their day in a smaller academic setting while efficiently sharing with older students large-scale school facilities such as the cafeteria, gyms and fine arts center. Freshmen will have their own separate lunch period in the new cafeteria, but will have access during the school day to the shared fine arts and athletics facilities and an option for advanced courses in the 10-12 grade classrooms. The Freshman Center also will have its own exterior entrance and commons area as well as pick-up/drop-off zone on the east side of the campus.

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